Valencia Street

Book An Appointment

Valencia Street Team

  • Bob Dylan

    ×

    Bob Dylan

    Lucky Wilbury

    Bob Dylan (/ˈdɪlən/; born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer, songwriter, musician, painter, and writer. He has been influential in popular music and culture for more than five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when he became a reluctant “voice of a generation”[2] with songs such as “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin’“, which became anthems for the Civil Rights Movement and anti-war movement. Leaving behind his initial base in the American folk music revival, his six-minute single “Like a Rolling Stone“, recorded in 1965, enlarged the range of popular music.

    It is widely rumored that this photo inspired an entire generation to get their haircut.

  • Tom Petty

    ×

    Tom Petty

    Charlie T. Wilbury, Jr.

    Thomas Earl Petty[1] (October 20, 1950 – October 2, 2017) was an American musician, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer best known as the lead singer of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. He was also a member and co-founder of the late 1980s supergroup the Traveling Wilburys, and his early band Mudcrutch.

    Petty recorded a number of hit singles with the Heartbreakers and as a solo artist, many of which are mainstays on adult contemporary and classic rock radio. His music became popular among younger generations.[2] In his career, Petty sold more than 80 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling music artists of all time.[3] In 2002, Petty was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    Once when asked who cut his hair he admitted it cuts itself.

  • Roy Orbison

    ×

    Roy Orbison

    Lefty Wilbury

    Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988) was an American singer-songwriter known for his distinctive, impassioned voice, complex song structures, and dark emotional ballads. The combination led many critics to describe his music as operatic, nicknaming him “the Caruso of Rock[1] and “the Big O.” Between 1960 and 1964, 22 of his songs placed on the Billboard Top 40, including “Only the Lonely” (1960), “Crying” (1961), “In Dreams” (1963), and “Oh, Pretty Woman” (1964).

    Born in Texas, Orbison began singing in a rockabilly and country and western band in high school. He was signed by Sam PhillipsSun Records in 1956, but his greatest success came with Monument Records in the early 1960s. While most male rock and roll performers in the 1950s and 1960s projected a defiant masculinity, many of Orbison’s songs instead conveyed a quiet, almost desperate, vulnerability. His voice ranged from baritone to tenor, and music scholars have suggested that he had a three- or four-octave range.[2] During performances, he was known for standing still and solitary, and for wearing black clothes, to match his jet black hair and dark sunglasses, which lent an air of mystery to his persona.

    He is also known as the man whose hair stood still.

  • George Harrison

    ×

    George Harrison

    Nelson Wilbury

    George Harrison,[nb 1] MBE (25 February 1943 – 29 November 2001) was an English guitarist, singer-songwriter, and producer who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles. Often referred to as “the quiet Beatle”,[3][4] Harrison embraced Hinduism and helped broaden the horizons of his bandmates as well as their American audience by incorporating Indian instrumentation in their music.[5] Although most of the Beatles’ songs were written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, most Beatles albums from 1965 onwards contained at least two Harrison compositions. His songs for the group included “Taxman“, “Within You Without You“, “While My Guitar Gently Weeps“, “Here Comes the Sun” and “Something“, the last of which became the Beatles’ second-most covered song.

    True to form, the man had amazing hair.